Quick Answer: Do You Cut In On Second Coat?

If the first coat covered well, nothing showing through, then perhaps skip the cut-in.

But if it covered that well, then maybe the second coat isn’t needed.

Since a second coat is desired or needed, yes, cut in again as well.

Sure would hate to discover a second layer was needed after the paint dries.

Do you have to cut in twice?

A cut in line of about three inches is typically enough, but you can make it even wider if you want. All you have to do is brush some paint below your first cut in line to make it deeper. Cut, roll, cut, roll. Don’t cut in twice and then roll.

Do you let cut in dry before rolling?

Cut in the corners before you roll paint on the main surfaces. Use a 2- or 3-inch brush for paints. You can cut-in around the trim either before or after rolling. Because the drying time of flat and eggshell latex paint is so short, you can cut-in an entire room before filling in the walls.

How do I apply a second coat of paint?

You’ll need to give the first coat ample time to cure before adding the second. How long you’ll need to wait depends on the type of paint you use: Usually, you can apply a second coat of latex (water-based) paint two to four hours after the first. With oil-based paints, it’s best to wait a full 24 hours between coats.

Do I really need to wait 4 hours between coats of paint?

Exterior vs Interior Paint Dry Times

Whether you’re painting walls or trim, waiting 2-4 hours is normal between coats of paint. For a quicker drying solution, try applying a fast drying latex with a paint sprayer in a well ventilated area. You’ll get fast professional results.

What brush is best for cutting in?

Best paint brush overall: Presa Premium 5-Piece Paint Brush Set. Best paint brush for cutting: Wooster Shortcut 2-inch Angle Sash Brush. Best paint brush for edging: Shur-Line 500 Premium Paint Edger. Best natural hair paint brush: Purdy White Bristle Sprig 3-inch Flat Sash Brush.

Does second coat use less paint?

The second coat of paint goes on quickly and costs very little. The first coat goes on thicker and slower. The second coat of paint serves as a second skin or protector of the first coat, adding life to your paint job. You can expect some surfaces to last twice as long with a second coat!